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It Looks Clean But Are You Breathing In Clean Air?

The air inside your home only looks clean. It comes as no surprise that outdoor air pollution easily enters your home and brings in a bundle of deadly viruses, bacteria, allergens and other harmful pollutants that are invisible to the naked eye.

It comes as no surprise that outdoor air pollution easily enters your home and brings in a bundle of deadly viruses, bacteria, allergens and other harmful pollutants that are invisible to the naked eye. Even when doors and windows are closed, natural ventilation can bring in allergens and small particles – under 2.5 micrometers, to be precise.

Inhaling the polluted air can lead to various health problems like chest congestion, rhinitis, blocked nose and eye irritation, to name a few. Hence, maintaining clean air within your living space is very important.

Reports suggest, in and around the home, the Indoor Air Pollution (IAP) can exceed acceptable levels for fine particles 100-fold. Exposure is particularly high among women and young children, who spend most of the time near the domestic hearth.

According to WHO, 4.3 million people in a year die from the exposure to household air pollution. Young children and older adults have a weaker immune system, hence they are more susceptible to conditions such as asthma, heart disease and lung disease.

Effects of being exposed to indoor pollutant

Short Term

  • Blocked nose and eye irritation
  • Chest congestion
  • Hypersensitivity and allergies
  • Rhinitis
  • Bronchitis

Long Term

  • Long term effects have a much longer impact lasting for years or an entire lifetime
  • Heart disease
  • Respiratory disease
  • Damage to nerves, brain, kidneys and liver

The air you breathe at home is more harmful than you think.

There are indoor pollutants that can affect your loved one’s health because of the air quality in an enclosed space.

We bring you a compiled summary of the pollutants that you should be aware of.

  • Pollens, which originate from plants
  • Viruses, which are transmitted by people and animals
  • Mould
  • Bacteria, which are carried by people, animals, and soil and plant debris
  • Household pets, which are sources of saliva and animal dander (skin flakes)
  • Droppings and body pats from cockroaches, rodens and other pests or insects
  • Viruses and bacteria
  • The protein in urine from rats and mice is a potent allergen. When it dries, it can become airborne
  • Contaminated central air handling systems can become breeding grounds for mold, mildew and other sources of biological contaminants and can then distribute these contaminants through the home

Many of these biological contaminants are small enough to be inhaled.

Biological contaminants are or are produced by living things. Biological contaminants are often found in areas that provide food and moisture or water. For example: damp or wet areas such as cooling coils, humidifiers, condensate pans or unvented bathrooms can be mouldy draperies, bedding, carpet and other areas where dust collects may accumulate biological contaminants.

As a general practice, to keep molds, bacteria and viruses from growing, the humidity levels of your home should be 40-60%. A well-humidified room makes the air more comfortable to breathe and helps prevent allergies.

The easiest way to improve air quality on regular intervals is to use Air Purifiers. Explore a smarter way to breathe fresh inside your home

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